art

photographing the secret couples of china’s ‘garden island’

In Xiamen, technology is creating a new, alternative form of intimacy, says photographer Sarah Mei Herman.

Via i-D

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Illustrations for a Chinese Lord of the Rings in a Stunning “Glass Painting Style”

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Book covers drawn by artist Jian Guo.

Part of a competition held by the publisher of the new Chinese text, the beautiful, monochromatic illustrations draw on many of the design elements of Tolkien’s original paintings for the trilogy’s covers, elaborating on the iconic ring and towers with intricate Asian lines and flourishes.

The artist, an architectural student, describes his style as “glass painting style,” which he uses for its “sense of religious magnificence.” Interestingly, before seeing Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings adaptation in 2002, he had never heard of the books. (Previous Chinese translations of the books feature rather unimaginative covers with images from Jackson’s movies.) The films converted him into an avid reader of Tolkien.

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Fu Baoshi art


This is an ink painting by Chinese artist Fu Baoshi (1904–1965) showing a scholar artist in his studio. Fu Baoshi was a scholar painter and art historian. He studied Western and Japanese art in Tokyo where he developed his own style based on a fusion of Western realism and traditional brushwork. His work expressed a personal taste for subjects drawn from Chinese poets of the past.

Image © Fu Baoshi estate

Lu Chao’s Paintings Convey the Overwhelming Nature of Crowds

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People packed on train platforms and congregated in public spaces – these images that are so familiar to the city dweller are the inspiration behind Lu Chao’s surreal oil paintings. The artist references the detailed, expressive brushstrokes of classical Chinese painting, applied to a contemporary subject matter, to provide an honest reflection of his personal experiences with living in some of the world’s most populated cities.

Found on Hi-Fructose

Sky Ladder: The Fireworks Art of Cai Guo-Qiang

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On June 15, 2015, at the break of dawn, artist Cai Guo-Qiang set off a giant white balloon filled with 6,200 cubic meters of helium. As the orb ascended above Huiyu Island Harbour in Quanzhou, China, it carried with it a 500-meter-long ladder coated in quick-burning fuses and gold fireworks. Guo-Qiang then ignited the structure, setting off his awe-inspiring creation called Sky Ladder.