illustration

Jing Wei Illustrations

Illustrations for Lucky Peach by Jing Wei.

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Illustrations for a Chinese Lord of the Rings in a Stunning “Glass Painting Style”

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Book covers drawn by artist Jian Guo.

Part of a competition held by the publisher of the new Chinese text, the beautiful, monochromatic illustrations draw on many of the design elements of Tolkien’s original paintings for the trilogy’s covers, elaborating on the iconic ring and towers with intricate Asian lines and flourishes.

The artist, an architectural student, describes his style as “glass painting style,” which he uses for its “sense of religious magnificence.” Interestingly, before seeing Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings adaptation in 2002, he had never heard of the books. (Previous Chinese translations of the books feature rather unimaginative covers with images from Jackson’s movies.) The films converted him into an avid reader of Tolkien.

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Oliver Jeffers‘ Five Hour Guide to Shanghai

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Illustrations from Oliver Jeffers‘ “One City, Five Hours” project appear regularly in the United Airlines magazine, Hemisphere, pairing Jeffers’ illustrations with various travel writers’ five hour guides to common layover city stops.

1. Start with Shanghai’s succulent signature pork and crab soup dumplings, xiaolong bao, at Din Tai Fung (South Block, Unit 11, House 6, Ln. 123 Xingye Rd.; www.dintaifung.com.tw). Use the tried-and-true technique: Nibble a small hole in the dumpling and suck out the broth before biting into it – but beware, it’s hot! (0:30)

2. Stroll into Xintiandi (www.xintiandi.com), where restored shikumen (stone gate) homes dating back to the 1860s now house chic restaurants and shops. Forget about the schlocky souvenirs, and buy something functional, like a contemporary teapot at Zen Lifestore or a handbag made from colorful sandbag cloth at Oshadai. (1:30)

3. Before leaving Xintiandi, peek into the Shikumen Open House Museum (25, Ln. 181, Taicang Rd.) to see a re-creation of what these cute houses looked like in the 1920s, complete with vintage sewing machines and magazines with Hollywood stars on the covers. (2:00)

 

 

Illustration art

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Chinese landscape by Dadu Shin

 

Illustrations by Oamul Lu     website / Facebook / Tumblr / Behance

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《水獭先生的新邻居》Mr. Otter’s New Neighbors by 李 星明 on Behance.

 

 

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Kaya Huang  Cargo/ Facebook

 

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A bookstore display window design by Inca Pan.

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The voice of the salt illustration by Inca Pan.

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A book talking about education in China, cover art illustration by Inca Pan.

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A poetry book illustration by Inca Pan.

Illustration art by I Ying Yeh   BlogspotFacebook

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Chinese born, New York based illustrator Jun Cen did a series  of illustrations for the 1930 | Her Living Room exhibition at The Mix-Place (衡山和集) in Shanghai. The show combines fashion, art and design to portray the fashionable lives of the Shanghai women in the 30s In the 30s of the last century, Shanghai was already an international metropolis that had the vibes of the east and the west. The Shanghai ladies were independent, well educated, pretty and had good sense in fashion no matter they were dressing in the traditional Qipao or western clothing.