Author: Mia

Warhol in China

 

Andy Warhol in China, 1982, looking like a real tourist!

Courtesy of Phillips

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Learn Chinese with Peanuts

跳舞 ( tiào wǔ) – dance

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若有人结婚, 我要在婚礼跳舞!
Ruò yǒurén jiéhūn, wǒ yào zài hūnlǐ tiàowǔ!
If anyone has a wedding, I want to dance at it!

跳 (tiào) – jump

jump
绳子不会跳! Shéngzi bù huì tiào! The rope can’t jump!

***

今天早上我和爸爸比赛跳绳,爸爸先跳,妈妈记时数数,爸爸一分钟跳了128个,该我上场了,爸爸数数,妈妈记时,我这次没有失误,一分钟跳了145个,我的心砰砰乱跳,都快蹦出来了,妈妈弃权了,我成了全家中的第一名,,我好开心。

 

 

唱歌 (chàng gē) – sing

activities
我们唱歌,画图  Wǒmen chànggē, huàtú   We sing songs, paint pictures

我们听故事, 用蜡笔插颜色, 我们休息, 我们吃东西, 玩游戏
wǒmen tīng gùshì, yòng làbǐ chā yánsè, wǒmen xiūxí, wǒmen chī dōngxī, wán yóuxì
We listen to stories, color with crayons, we rest, we eat, play games

我们玩得很愉快!    wǒmen wán dé hěn yúkuài!    We have a good time!

每个孩子都 应该去幼稚园!
Měi gè háizi dōu yīnggāi qù yòuzhìyuán!
Every child should go to kindergarten!

answers

我对生命有很多问题,可是我却找不到答案
Wǒ duì shēngmìng yǒu hěnduō wèntí, kěshì wǒ què zhǎo bù dào dá’àn

我要一些很直接清楚的答案…
Wǒ yào yīxiē hěn zhíjiē qīngchǔ de dá’àn…

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Taoist Master Zhuangzi

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庄周 (庄子)

The fish trap exists because of the fish. Once you’ve gotten the fish you can forget the trap. The rabbit snare exists because of the rabbit. Once you’ve gotten the rabbit, you can forget the snare. Words exist because of meaning. Once you’ve gotten the meaning, you can forget the words. Where can I find a man who has forgotten words so I can talk with him?

***

Flow with whatever may happen, and let your mind be free: Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. This is the ultimate.

***

chuangtzu_dreaming_butterfly

Once upon a time, I dreamt I was a butterfly, fluttering hither and thither, to all intents and purposes a butterfly. I was conscious only of my happiness as a butterfly, unaware that I was myself. Soon I awaked, and there I was, veritably myself again. Now I do not know whether I was then a man dreaming I was a butterfly, or whether I am now a butterfly, dreaming I am a man.

***

A path is made by walking on it.

***

Let your heart be at peace.
Watch the turmoil of beings
but contemplate their return.

If you don’t realize the source,
you stumble in confusion and sorrow.
When you realize where you come from,
you naturally become tolerant,
disinterested, amused,
kindhearted as a grandmother,
dignified as a king.
Immersed in the wonder of the Tao,
you can deal with whatever life brings you,
And when death comes, you are ready.

***

I cannot tell if what the world considers ‘happiness’ is happiness or not. All I know is that when I consider the way they go about attaining it, I see them carried away headlong, grim and obsessed, in the general onrush of the human herd, unable to stop themselves or to change their direction. All the while they claim to be just on the point of attaining happiness.

***

To a mind that is still, the entire universe surrenders.

***

If a man crosses a river
and an empty boat collides with his own skiff,
Even though he be bad tempered man
He will not become very angry.
But if he sees a man in the boat,
He will shout at him to steer clear.
If the shout is not heard, he will shout again, and yet again, and begin cursing.
And all because someone is in the boat.
Yet if the boat were empty,
He would not be shouting, and not angry.
If you can empty your own boat
Crossing the river of the world,
No one will oppose you,
No one will seek to harm you

***

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Designer: YAT PIT

Yat Pit (meaning “the first stroke” in Cantonese) makes Chinese fashion – but not as you know it. The brand’s founders – Jason Mui and On-Ying Lai – are on a mission to “revive lost Chinese culture” and clothes are their medium.

Based in Hong Kong, the pair like to imagine how Chinese youth might dress if the Cultural Revolution hadn’t taken place. They take cues from traditional Chinese clothes to do so – garments which, from dynasty to dynasty, have maintained a similarly bulky, gender-neutral silhouette. Rooted in their love for and interest in their heritage, Lai and Mui are showing a different side to Chinese style – one that’s far from the West’s orientalist and, all too often, appropriative clichés.

Photography by Ren Hang

(Via Dazed)

Vanilla Bean Parfait with Orange Granita

HVanilla-Bean-Parfait-Kristin-Teig

Serves 6

INGREDIENTS

  • For the Parfait:
  • 1/2 fresh vanilla bean
  • 6 large egg yolks
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 recipe Orange Granita (recipe follows)
  • 2 oranges, peeled and pith removed, sliced into thin rounds
  • 6 to 8 fresh mint leaves
  • For the Orange Granita (Makes 4 cups):
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 1/2 cups fresh orange juice

PREPARATION

1To make the parfait

Line a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap. Split the vanilla bean in half lengthwise with a sharp small knife and open it up. Use the knife to scrape out the seeds, where all the wonderful vanilla flavor is. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or in a medium bowl using a hand mixer, whip the egg yolks and vanilla bean seeds on medium speed until the yolks have lightened in color and become somewhat frothy, 3 to 4 minutes.

2Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the sugar and [1/2] cup water and stir to dissolve the sugar. Clip a candy thermometer to the side of the pan and cook the sugar syrup over high heat until it reaches soft ball stage, 238°F.

3With the mixer running on low speed, drizzle the hot sugar syrup down the side of the mixer bowl into the yolks. When all the syrup has been incorporated, increase the mixer speed to medium. Whip for 8 to 10 minutes, until the mixture is light and fluffy and cool. Poke your finger in there to test the temperature.

4Meanwhile, in a separate bowl, whip the heavy cream and salt together until they hold stiff peaks (i.e., when you lift a spoonful of the cream it holds its shape well). Gently fold the whipped cream into the cooled fluffy egg-sugar mixture. Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth and even out the top. Cover the pan entirely with plastic wrap and freeze for at least 24 hours and up to 1 week.

5Remove the vanilla parfait from freezer and remove the plastic wrap. Using a hot sharp knife, slice the parfait into six slices and place one on each of six dessert plates. Divide the granita evenly among the six plates. Arrange the orange slices evenly on top of the granita. Thinly slice the mint and sprinkle it evenly on top of all six dishes. Serve immediately.

6To make the granita

In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar and [1/2] cup water and bring to a boil. Add the orange juice and stir. Transfer to a metal or plastic container that fits in your freezer. Freeze for 3 to 4 hours. Every 30 minutes, use a fork to scrape and mix the granita so it does not freeze into a solid block. It should be completely frozen but still easily spoonable. Cover with plastic wrap and store in the freezer for up to 1 month.

Vanilla Bean Parfait with Orange Granita excerpted from MYERS+CHANG AT HOME © 2017 by Joanne Chang with Karen Akunowicz. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

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(Found on: Design Sponge)

Lucky Peach’s Chineasy Cucumber Salad

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Reprinted with permission from Lucky Peach Presents 101 Easy Asian Recipes

  • Prep Time: 20 minutes
  • Level of Difficulty: Easy
  • Serving Size: Makes about 2 servings, easily multiplied

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon Chinkiang vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Sichuan chili oil
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon turbinado sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3 Persian or Kirby cucumbers or 1 English cucumber
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds
  • 2 tablespoons crushed roasted unsalted peanuts
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves

Directions

For the salad
  1. Whisk together the vinegar, chili oil, sesame oil, sugar, and salt in a medium bowl until the sugar dissolves. Set the dressing aside.
  2. Halve the cucumbers lengthwise. (If using English cucumbers, remove the seeds with a small spoon and discard.) Set them cut-side down on a cutting board and lightly smash them: Give them a couple angry thwaps with the side of a cleaver (or a large chef’s knife) until the cucumbers crack in a few places. (For less drama, just press down on them with the side of the knife.) Cut the abused cucumbers crosswise into ¾-inch-thick half-moons.
  3. Toss the cucumbers in the dressing, portion them out onto plates, and top each serving with sesame seeds, peanuts, and cilantro.

(Found on: Food Republic)