Work and occupations

10155220_702699326463367_6354067759772623794_n

This character is based on a primitive carpenter’s square (used to measure right angles). 工 hasn’t changed much in its thousand-year history, and is used today in phrases that refer to things requiring effort or that are work related, e.g. 工人 (worker, pinyin: gong2ren2, gōngrén), 工夫 (effort, pinyin: gong1fu1, gōngfū), and 木工 (carpentry, pinyin: mu4gong1, mùgōng).

工 as noun: work, labour, trade, craft
工 as adjective: delicate
工 as verb: to be good at

PINYIN: 工 (gong1, gōng)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/PNCg0P
Stroke: http://bit.ly/1kom7tP
Style: Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity: Common

P.S. The Chinese for International Worker’s Day and US Labor Day is 勞動節 (pinyin: lao2dong4jie2, láodòngjié)

The compound 勞 means “labour” or “toil”. (pinyin: lao2, láo)
The compound 動 means “to act”, “to move”, or “to use”. (pinyin: dong4, dòng)

勞動 = 勞 (Labour, Toil) + 動 (Move, Act, Use) = [literally] (Labour Move); (Work, Physical Labour) (pinyin: lao2dong4, láodòng)

Now, just to make it a celebration… we add 節, which means “ knot”, “joint”, and “festival”. (pinyin: jie2, jié).

勞動節 = 勞動 (Work, Physical Labour) + 節 (Festival, Knot, Joint) = [literally] (Work Festival); (Labour Day)

PINYIN: 勞動節 (lao2dong4jie2, láodòngjié)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1icc1MZ
Stroke: http://bit.ly/1f9Ppx0
Style:
勞動節: Traditional
劳动节: Simplified
Rarity: Common

Source: Chineasy

10342506_723146674418632_4863309028691281577_n

工人 = 工 (Work) + 人 (Person) = Worker

工人
Pinyin: gong1 ren2
(Simplified, Traditional and Kanji)
Pronunciation/Stroke Order:
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp
人: http://bit.ly/1km9XTy

Source: Chineasy

10441196_723147964418503_3288688256638821907_n

In addition to “female worker”, this phrase can also mean “women’s work”, which stereotypically refers to things like sewing, embroidery, etc.

女工= 女 (Woman) + 工 (Work) = Female Worker

女工
Pinyin: nu3 gong1
(Traditional, Simplified and Kanji)
Pronunciation + Stroke Order:
女: http://bit.ly/U5GbsU
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp

Source: Chineasy

work

office.png

Illustration: Hua Zhong Wen

10175028_703352439731389_8591296857441666227_n

一手 = ㄧ (One, Whole) + 手 (Hand) = [literally] (One Hand); (Skill, Proficiency)

一 as a noun: one, single, a
一 as adjective: whole, full, same, unified, concentrated, single-minded, alone, single, pure
一 as adverb: all, very, straight, always, all along, once, in case, one by one, one after another

手 as noun: hand, a person good at a certain trade or doing a certain job, someone’s original handwriting, skill, ability, domain
手 as adverb: personally
手 as verb: to hold, to kill, ex: 徒手格鬥, unarmed combat, PINYIN: tu2shou3ge2dou4, túshǒugédòu)
手 as measuring word: 一手好菜 (good cook, PINYIN: yi4shou3hao3cai4, yìshǒuhǎocài)
手 as adjective: portable
一手 as noun: skill, proficiency, trick
一手 as adverb: by oneself, all alone

PINYIN: 一手 (yi4shou3, yìshǒu)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1hi8pUL
Stroke: http://bit.ly/1i93tl9
Style:Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity:Common

Source: Chineasy

10151381_697386033661363_2844299144364630583_n

This phrase is a lot like the English one, “hired hand”. Instead of literally referring to a hand, it’s usually used as a noun that refers to a type of worker. Check it out:

人手 = 人 (People) + 手 (Hand) = [literally] (Person’s Hand); (Staff), (Manpower), (One’s Hand)

人 as noun: person, other people, human life
人 as adjective: artificial
人 as pronoun: everyone

手 as noun: hand, a person good at a certain trade or doing a certain job, someone’s original handwriting, skill, ability, domain, staff
手 as adverb: personally
手 as verb: hold, kill
手 as measuring word: 一手好菜 (good cook, PINYIN: yi4shou3hao3cai4, yìshǒuhǎocài)
手 as adjective: portable

人手 as noun: staff, manpower, one’s hand

PINYIN: 人手 (ren2shou3, rénshǒu)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1gNlHwk
Stroke: http://bit.ly/1gNlOrE
Style: Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity: Common

Source: Chineasy

10154240_697387606994539_8542054148702053190_n.png

If you’ve got a “good hand” at something, it means you are an expert, master, or professional at that activity. Let’s take a look at how this phrase is built:

好手 = 好 (Good) + 手 (Hand) = [literally] (A Good Hand); (Expert), (Professional), (Master)

好 as adjective: good, fine, nice, friendly, kind, likely, simply, well, finished, completed, all right, okay, suitable, fitting
好 as adverb: very, good, how
好 as auxiliary: may, ought to, so as to
好 as noun: preference, hobby (PINYIN: hao4, hào)
好 as verb: be fond of (PINYIN: hao4, hào)

手 as noun: hand, a person good at a certain trade or doing a certain job, someone’s original handwriting, skill, ability, domain
手 as adverb: personally
手 as verb: hold, kill
手 as measuring word: 一手好菜 (good cook, PINYIN: yi4shou3hao3cai4, yìshǒuhǎocài)
手 as adjective: portable

好手 as noun: expert, professional, master

PINYIN: 好手 (hao3shou3, hǎoshǒu)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1kTBiMA
Stroke: http://bit.ly/1e5Q425
Style: Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity: Common

Source: Chineasy

10410513_727820423951257_8524418754943466752_n

美工  means “art designer” or “art design” in Chinese.

What do you think about the Chineasy designs?

美工= 美 (Beautiful) + 工 (Work) = Art Design; Art Designer

美工
Pinyin: mei3 gong1
(Simplified, Traditional and Kanji)
Pronunciation/Stroke Order:
美: http://bit.ly/1lc0dLQ
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp

P.S. If you don’t know about the famous Chinese art designer Ai Weiwei, you may enjoy his work. He is quite controversial in China.

Source: Chineasy

10550828_759030860830213_5545185712756879597_n.png

n China, social work stopped in 1949 when the People’s Republic of China took control of the country. Since then, it’s been brought back in a big way. Currently, the government has plans to produce a ton of social workers in the next 6 years. In a country of over 1.3 Billion people, you can imagine how important it is to have social workers!

社工 = 社 (Society) + 工 (Work) = Social Worker

Source: Chineasy

10168023_690292144370752_3682473597956109104_n

出品人 means “producer”, as in a film producer. After we deconstruct the phrase and review the individual characters, I’m going to tell you about one of, if not the most, influential film producers in Asia ever. For you film buffs, here’s a hint: he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1977.

出 (To Get Out) + 品 (Quality, Product) + 人 (Person) = [literally] (Person Who Gets Out Products); (Producer)

出 as verb: go out, appear, show, produce, issue, exceed, bring out, publish, happen, marry, drive out, bear
出 as a measuring word: a dramatic piece

The Chinese character 品 has been formed with three 口 (mouth) characters since the oracle-bone inscriptions. 口 (mouth) represents a “man” or “human” in this context, and the three mouths together are three people: a crowd. The original definition of 品 is “numerous”, but in modernity it has been extended to mean “article”, “product”, “class”, or “grade”.

品 as adjective: like, similar, same
品 as noun: species, character, grade, rank, style, standard, rule, commodity, article
品 as verb: blow, judge, taste something with discrimination, sample, savour

出品 as a verb: to publish, to make
出品 as a noun: product

人 as noun: other people, human life
人 as adjective: artificial
人 as pronoun: everyone

出品人 as noun: producer〔also called 製片人 (t.) / 制片人 (s.) (PINYIN: zhi4pian4ren2, zhìpiànrén ) 〕

PINYIN:: 出品人 (chu1pin3ren2, chūpǐnrén)
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1iG8k3e
Stroke:
出: http://bit.ly/1keVpBr
品: http://bit.ly/1dKD2jx
人: http://bit.ly/18vF0ml
Style: Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity: Common

One of the most influential film producers ever, 邵逸夫爵士 (Sir Run Run Shaw)’s awesome name is completely dwarfed by his amazing legacy. Just to give you small taste of what this man has accomplished; Sir Run Run Shaw started his own movie studio in Hong Kong that became Asia’s Hollywood and the largest producer of Asian films in the 60’s. Then, he moved into television, and TBL (the company he co-founded) soon became the largest producer of television content in Asia. But he didn’t stop at being a successful business man. Sir Run Run Shaw donated HK$6.5 billion to various causes in China. That’s a lot of money! He even created the Shaw Prize, which is similar to the Nobel Prize in the West. Oh, and according to a TVB general manager, Mr. Bean was Run Run’s favorite show. How awesome is that? To learn more about this philanthropic film mogul, check out his wiki page here: http://bit.ly/1kKGAsi. His Hong Kong studio had a lot of influence on Western Cinema. Movies like Kill Bill and Blade Runner may never have been possible without his influence.

Source: Chineasy

10358127_723644917702141_2252185247514957369_n.png

When most people hear the word “China” they immediately think of the famous “made in China” tagline that can be found on many products. Why does it seem like everything is made in China? Because the cost of production in China is much lower than it is in the West!

The phrase I’d like to share with you today means “cost of production”. How about that? You’re learning some business Chinese!

工本 = 工 (Work) + 本 (Origin) = Cost of Production

工本
Pinyin: gong1 ben3
(Simplified, Traditional and Kanji)
Pronunciation/Stroke Order:
工:http://bit.ly/T47rHp
本: http://bit.ly/1kYIdEr

Source: Chineasy

10441206_723144514418848_7103111397341243305_n.png

Carpentry and woodworking have played a key role in traditional Chinese architecture. So here it is today:

木工 = 木 (Tree) + 工 (Work) = Woodwork; Carpenter

木工
Pinyin: mu4 gong1
(Traditional, Simplified and Kanji)
Pronunciation + Stroke Order:
木: http://bit.ly/1m3qngn
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp

Source: Chineasy

10390371_720193441380622_4733759179654232353_n

保安 = 保 (To Protect) + 安 (Safe) = Security Guard

Just like the English word “security”, 保安 can be used as a verb that means “ensuring public safety”, or “to secure”. It also works like the English noun “security”, which refers to a security guard(s).

保安 pinyin bao3an1
Style: Traditional and Simplified and Kanji
Rarity: Common
Pronunciation: http://bit.ly/1m6tzxN

Source: Chineasy

10958988_891348300931801_5963305817768115613_n.png

The phrase 水手 means ‘sailor’ in Chinese and is formed by two characters: 水 (water) and 手 (hand). The way I like to remember the phrase is by thinking that 水手 always give a hand (手) to keep a ship afloat on the water (水). In an emergency, you might even hear someone shout, ‘all hands on deck!’. Source: Chineasy

10409786_723644504368849_2558587365137174616_n.png

手工 = 手 (Hand) + 工 (Work) = Handmade

手工
Pinyin: shou3 gong1
(Simplified, Traditional and Kanji)
Pronunciation/Stroke Order:
手: http://bit.ly/1oiE9hV
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp

Source: Chineasy

10407193_727250047341628_1287926897185987644_n.png

Today’s phrase can mean both “effort” and “time” depending on the specific context of your sentence.

工夫= 工 (Work) + 夫 (Man) = Effort; Time

工夫
Pinyin: gong1 fu1
(Simplified, Traditional and Kanji)
Pronunciation/Stroke Order:
工: http://bit.ly/T47rHp
夫: http://bit.ly/1i9zFGK

Source: Chineasy

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s